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pleasantfowl:

felicefawn:

Coloring embryos by injecting dye into eggs before they hatch has been practiced for a number of years. It is done to identify the young of certain hatches or groups. And it makes it easier to observe movements of wild birds (especially water fowl) after they leave the nests.

The process of coloring chicks by injecting dye into the eggs also provides an opportunity to study early feather growth. Juvenile plumage will replace the colored down in about two weeks. As this happens, the dyed background amid new growing feathers provides a constantly changing pattern.

While it is possible to inject eggs from about the 10th to 19th days of incubation, the period from the 11th to 14th days appears to be ideal. Only one treatment is necessary if the injection is done at this time. When injections are made after the 14th day the color usually remains localized because the embryo occupies most of the egg; so it may be necessary to inject the egg in more than one place.

Harmless vegetable dyes, such as food coloring dyes sold in grocery stores, work very satisfactorily.

This does not harm the chicks in any way, and eventually as they mature their adult feathers push through and they develop normally with their standard coloured feathers.

The big problem in this practice lies with the fact that colored chicks are treated more like novelty objects than living things, and often bought on a whim by people who think they look pretty but don’t have the means to take care of them for the long term. Because of this, many chickens end up getting dumped off places, such as shelters, where they are sometimes euthanized, or just dying (no pun intended) because they can’t be taken care of by the people who bought them. The dye itself isn’t the problem, as it’s usually just food coloring, and is said to be harmless (although that’s up for debate - even if the dye doesn’t affect them, I’m willing to bet the process of making a hole in the shell to inject the dye increases the risk of infection to the embryo, even if the hole is covered, as any invasive procedure into the shell would do). 

There are already many, many chicks, ducklings, and goslings that end up unwanted around Easter, because people buy them compulsively without taking into account that they’re going to have to take care of them. Many of these animals end up snuffing it. 

From what I can gather, colored chicks don’t seem to be as much of a problem in the US anymore, but are big in the Philippines, where they are sometimes soaked or sprayed in dye, instead of the embryo being dyed.


People screaming ‘animal abuse!’ everywhere can be annoying, but at least they care enough to question stuff like this, even if that concern can sometime be misplaced. It doesn’t hurt to do a little research, and to question and consider things instead of throwing hate back and forth at each other.

If you buy dyed Easter chicks with the full willingness to give them proper care for the long-term, fantastic! However, because of the problems with the practice of dying chicks, it’s not a great thing to support, and if you really, really have to have a dyed chick, there are plenty of tutorials online of how to do it yourself. Added bonus: you get to see the whole incubation process as well!

Source: blog.felicefawn.com

pleasantfowl:

This. This is Tamer. Where to even begin with him? I can’t even begin to say in a single post how amazing he is. He a character among characters, a dork among dorks, a goof among - well…I’ll let the gifs speak for themselves for now. 

Source: pleasantfowl

Little Howler 🐾

Little Howler 🐾

#EarthDay
#ProtectYourNeighborhood

#EarthDay
#ProtectYourNeighborhood

old school ☺

old school ☺

Corgie takes a vacation ☺

Corgie takes a vacation ☺

Mother’s Love ❤

Mother’s Love ❤

agameofwolves:

Source.

agameofwolves:

Source.

ladyk23:

femalexxrebel:

phototoartguy:

The man’s best friend!

Literally nothing better than the love you receive from a dog.

Aw. Dog wearing cap and gown. Reblogging for that alone.

Source: newsbeast.gr